Khadi - A Symbol for the Slow Fashion Movement & an Artistically Beautiful Rebellion Against Fast Fashion.

Khadi - A Symbol for the Slow Fashion Movement & an Artistically Beautiful Rebellion Against Fast Fashion.

Textiles are my passion. I am a textile nerd, weirdo, fanatic! For example, when I go op-shopping, I don’t even look at the colours, brands or styles. I run my fingers along the clothing and stop when I find a potential treasure.

With my label I have the luxury to go even deeper with my textile extremism. Firstly, I make sure that everything is ethically produced from the cotton farmer, all the way through the supply chain . I select organic, hand loomed eco dyed fabrics from accredited suppliers such as MORALFIBRE. Fabrics are selected intentionally to support income for those in most need. Resulting in a fabric that is both artisan and soulful.  

When clothes are designed to improve the social design of humanity and are as light as possible on its ecological impact, its kind of like making magic, where art, culture, consumerism and humanity are woven in away that does good and feels good.

The hand loomed fabrics for this years collection have been sourced through MORALFIBRE, because I love how they support artisans in a decentralised manner. Fabrics are from co-operatives with self-employed artisans; mainly working from homes in remote villages. MORALFIBRE Is a member of the FAIR TRADE FORUM, India. Also, they are one of the very few certified suppliers of Khadi fabrics in India. 

Khadi or khaddar is a hand spun, hand-woven natural fibre. Spun into yarn on a spinning wheel called a charkha. My love for this type of fabric started with an image of Mahatma Gandhi – He made the charkha more than just tool for making something, it became a symbol of the Indian independence movement and the peaceful rebellion. This image inspired change. For me, Khadi (fabric) also translates into a symbol for the slow fashion movement and the artistically beautiful rebellion against fast fashion.

Love,

Yvie xo

Note: Picture of  Mahatma Gandhi via Public Domain via Wikipedia.